Whitetail Related Car Crashes

Overpopulation of whitetails is a bad thing for motorists. When populations breech capacity accidents increase, damage occurs and people get hurt. This is the reason more urban deer hunting is needed.

Car accident percentages are astounding. The Insurance Journal reported in 2012 that whitetails cause approximately 200 deaths and $4 billion dollars in damage per year. Those are two numbers that can be reduced by allowing hunters to effectively manage deer herds.

Hunters believe there is no way good hunting can be had if there are houses and streets in site. Those who live in urban areas typically think hunting will put them in severe danger. Both couldn’t be more false.

Hunting actually makes roadways safer. It reduces chances of having negative health impacts. Most urban areas permit bowhunting. And some permit gun hunting as well. Either way, don’t think a hunter will shoot you dead just because one is near your home. Chances of injury are extremely minute. That number is especially lower when hunting with a bow.

Most urban areas are seeing a flux in deer populations. The trend seems to find deer inhabiting urban areas because they know they aren’t hunted there. Stay ahead of the curve and start getting permission to hunt such areas. Your trophy wall and deep freeze will be fuller if you do.

Hunting is crucial for a healthy suburban life. If you don’t want to hunt, allow someone else to hunt the area for you. Both you and your neighbors will be safer if you do.

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11 thoughts on “Whitetail Related Car Crashes

  1. Hello,

    As someone who disapproves of hunting, your article did sway my opinions a little with the linked statistics regarding car accidents; however, I feel like a lot of your claims were unsupported by facts. For example, the below sentences were not supported with any statistics or sources:

    “Chances of injury are so minute that it doesn’t even register. That number is especially lower when hunting with a bow. Most urban areas are seeing a flux in deer populations. The trend seems to find deer inhabiting urban areas because they know they won’t be hunted there.”

    That said, overall the article was good. However, be sure to watch out for minor grammar errors! I noticed you said, “You’re trophy wall and deep freeze will be fuller if you do.” Being as “You’re” means “you are” this does not fit with what you are trying to say. Instead, you should write “Your.” – Mercedes

    • Mercedes,

      I appreciate your feedback. A wise person knows how to take advice from others. That said, I do have a couple of small issues with your comment.

      First off, I must ask why it is that you disapprove of hunting? The sport of hunting is often very misunderstood. So misunderstood in fact that hunters are often depicted as “merciless killers” who have no heart.

      This couldn’t be further from the truth. Hunters are actually the number one group in terms of funding wildlife management, habitat improvement, etc. Most of this money comes from the sales of hunting licenses and tags. To satisfy your need for second opinions, see the two links below.

      http://www.ducks.org/hunting/du-and-hunting/hunters-do-more-for-wildlife

      http://kdwpt.state.ks.us/KDWPT-Info/News/News-Archive/2012-Weekly-News/1-5-12/FISH-AND-WILDLIFE-MANAGEMENT-WHERE-THE-MONEY-COMES-FROM

      Licenses and tags are not the only areas we fund wildlife. I personally implement a common practice that most deer hunters share. It is called quality deer management. Also referred to as QDM. I plant annual food plots so whitetail deer have ample nutrition. I keep out mineral sites year-round. I make sure water sources are put in place if droughts occur during summer. I keep track of herd health by posting trail cameras in the areas that I hunt. I monitor sex ratios to ensure that they do not become unbalanced (which leads to a number of problems). I keep feed available during winter to help them through the colder months. The list goes on. None of which is cheap to do. Most hunters do all of the things I just mentioned.

      http://www.qdma.com/

      As you stand in opposition of hunting, I must ask a few questions. Do you eat meat? If so, how is a hunter harvesting their own venison so different than those who go to the supermarket to buy theirs? Simply put, there is no difference other than I truly know where my meat comes from and you do not. Would you rather whitetails suffer from long, drawn out deaths from disease and starvation than from quick, humane methods used by hunters? Such is what happens when hunters are absent from the equation (please see the link below supporting this issue — of which came from a non-hunter). Lastly, what is the difference in humans killing deer than predators such as: cougars, bears, wolves and other carnivores? Humans are much more humane and methodical in their killing of deer than those predators listed. If you don’t believe me, watch a YouTube video of wolves killing prey. When hunters shoot a deer it is typically over in a matter of seconds. And I do not need a backup statistic to know this. As I have personally shot a multitude of deer in my time. The point is, I could go on asking you question after question concerning this topic. Yet they will all share a common ground — supporting evidence that hunting is truly a good thing for both humanity and wildlife.

      http://www.chathamjournal.com/weekly/opinion/chatlist/hunting-is-necessary-61228.shtml

      I must say, you are correct. There were no sources listed to back my claim about statistics between hunting with a bow and that of a gun (not that I oppose gun hunting — I do it annually). That is fairly common knowledge in the hunting community. The fact that urban areas are also seeing a flux in deer populations is also common knowledge and is applicable to most urban areas in today’s time (below is a link to Europe’s current problem on this issue with stag populations).

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8808494/Rutting-deer-a-problem-in-urban-areas.html

      As this is a blog and not a technical document, I did not feel the need to back every other word I said by someone else. I have spent most of my life learning about managing and hunting whitetails. Some of which has been done in urban and densely populated areas. Do I consider myself an expert? No. But this is a topic that I know a fair bit about. Had this been a “newspaper style article” I would have supported with more quotes and links. But in the grand scheme of things, this post was not that style of post.

      I appreciate your comments and your time. I hope to have more discussion with you so that we may bring the appropriate light to your view on hunting. The liberal media and agenda today completely misrepresent hunting. Hopefully, through respectful and appropriate discussion, we will correct these issues.

      • I just wanted to respond here to your follow up comment.

        I was assigned to review your blog for class purposes. In large, your reply was based on criticism of my dislike of hunting. Which, is fine.

        However, I was only mentioning the lack of sources because as a new blogger, you have yet to establish your credibility. If you can direct your audience to experts who concur with your statements, it makes your arguments stronger. What you are implying is “common knowledge” in the hunting community may not be common knowledge outside of the hunting community.

        As you know, our blog’s content is graded (in part) by what is written within the article. I have no background in photography so I did not feel as if I could offer any helpful feedback regarding the images you provided. Although, I will say, I thought the photo of the road was especially creative and I was impressed you got pictures of so many deer.

        That said, I think when making statements like: “The trend seems to find deer inhabiting urban areas because they know they won’t be hunted there” you should back up what you are saying with outside sources. I say this because I do question whether or not a deer can consciously be aware that hunters are not in urban areas. Because I question this statement, if I examine your article more closely, I can also question statements like: “Chances of injury are so minute that it doesn’t even register” as well.

        My commentary was meant to help you improve your current article. If you want your blog to have a more opinionated tone, rather than a “technical” tone, that is completely fine! It’s your blog to do what you want with. However, considering your topic in this instance was concerned with deer and the danger they impose on society, I feel that a more objective approach would have resonated better with your audience.

  2. Mercedes,

    I do want to point out that I appreciate your feedback. Thanks for pointing out the grammar mistake. It slipped by me when I went through and edited. I also appreciate your compliments on the photographs. I think the biggest factor that allowed me to get so many whitetail photos is I have been photographing them for several years now. So I had predetermined ideas as to the locations I should try to get them.

    As for the credibility, yes, this blog is a new blog. But I humbly say I would like to think I have built up my credibility somewhat through the 25 magazines, newspapers and websites that I write for. Twelve of which have a national viewing audience or readership. I also hope my credibility is further endorsed by the five associations I am an active member in. Of which include the: Professional Outdoor Media Association, Outdoor Writers Association of America, Southeastern Outdoor Press Association and more. Again, do I consider myself an expert? Absolutely not. I would not even entertain the thought. But I do think my credibility is satisfactory to be a 21-year-old.

    Am I against using links and expert opinions to back my claims? Not at all. I probably use as much or more in my outdoor writing than I have for this blog and class thus far.

    In response to your other statement, deer actually are very aware of their surroundings and nearby predators. This is something I have come to know in my 15 years of hunting. The main reason whitetails are so inapt is their sense of smell. Their sight and hearing are top of the line as well. It has long been proven that whitetails are able to understand human hunting pressure and change their habits and patterns to avoid us. Below are five links to back this up. The first is on whitetail vision and how they see. The second is on their hearing. The third is on their sense of smell — their greatest defense. The last two are on how deer are becoming more urbanized because they know hunters aren’t hunting (as much) close to cities and near residential areas. You can also go look at the video I embedded in my first post two weeks ago for more support on this topic .

    http://www.qdma.com/corporate/what-do-deer-see

    https://www.tinks.com/publisher/whitetail-research/2010/11/2/how-well-do-deer-hear

    http://www.hunterandquarry.com/scent-control-experiment-concluded/

    http://www.prohuntersjournal.com/article/default.asp?a=59

    http://www.gameandfishmag.com/2010/09/28/hunting_whitetail-deer-hunting_ra_0707_09/

    As for injuries, very few injuries occur from hunters. That includes both gun hunters and those using a bow. But the statistics on hunters in urban areas is just as I said it was in my blog — extremely low. You can find that information just about anywhere.

    Thanks for your input.

    • Hey Josh,

      One last thought, I would totally include those qualifications you listed (below) on your about page!

      “But I humbly say I would like to think I have built up my credibility somewhat through the 25 magazines, newspapers and websites that I write for. Twelve of which have a national viewing audience or readership. I also hope my credibility is further endorsed by the five associations I am an active member in. Of which include the: Professional Outdoor Media Association, Outdoor Writers Association of America, Southeastern Outdoor Press Association and more.”

  3. I truly enjoyed your article about White Tail car accidents.

    The photo slide show was filled with a wide variety of angles and subjects, still all relating to the topic. I specifically felt like the photos of the deer from birds eye view really showed the overpopulation of deer, although it may not be the most interesting of the photos it was obvious to me that it was placed in your slideshow for a reason.

    For future reference, I would suggest using a wider variety of sentence structure. I felt like the article was filled with great facts and references that support your claim but that overall it was a little choppy and could have been written with more fluidity. (I know this is a website class, not writing but that is the only thing that I felt like needed any significant critique)

    I hope my comments help!

  4. I don’t know much about hunting, but this was actually interesting to me. I didn’t realize how much trouble deer could cause. The pictures are great. I like that you used so many angles within your photo project. It was a lot more interesting than looking at the objects from just one angle.

  5. Great article. I am a landowner and farmer and have lived in the same area for 56 years. When I was a child there were no deer around. Now I continually see up to 20 and have seen up to 30 deer in any one small area. I have not yet ran over a deer, but a deer has run over me. This was while I was in my vehicle of course. I am not a hunter, I do not like the meat. They are a beautiful animal that I am thankful now to see almost daily.
    I do know several hunters. All of them are serious about the health of the deer, are grateful and thankful for their beauty and do enjoy eating the meat. If it wasn’t for these good men and lady hunters to keep them in balanced, manageable numbers the deer may not be so beautiful to see. When over population occurs it is not healthy for the deer, other animals nor for the people living around them. Thank you all for hunting.

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